Case Study: Nebraska School District

Determining The Real Issue

Case Studies on October 10th, 2009 2 Comments
A Nebraska School District needed to justify a new facility to replace a junior high built in 1917. The age of the building and its inadequate ability to accommodate a true middle school program were key factors in determining if the building should be remodeled or replaced. The fiscally conservative community had already defeated a bond issue to remodel due to public opinion that the old building already had enough space.
Strategic Resources West (SRW) recommended that a conditions assessment be completed to address the current needs of the seventh and eighth grade middle school configuration, as well as the chronic maintenance requirements of a  90+ year-old building. The recommendation also included a more comprehensive examination, which also considered the lack of space at the elementary level.
This analysis by Strategic Resources West revealed that moving the sixth graders up to the middle school in a new facility would resolve overcrowding issues at the elementary level through a “one school, rather than many” approach that clearly appealed to voters.
As part of the process, SRW facilitated a committee of well-respected, high profile community leaders to help educate and influence the public regarding the needs, options and consequences of not building a new middle school. The bond issue was fully supported by the committee, which led to a change in public opinion and a successful bond election. It was the first successful bond election passed by the community in many years.
Strategic Resources West facilitated the compelling process that was necessary to secure the success of one of the most important bond issues the community had seen in decades. The leadership, direction and comprehensive approach provided by SRW was the difference in assisting the school district with its needs.

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A Nebraska School District needed to justify a new facility to replace a junior high built in 1917. The age of the building and its inadequate ability to accommodate a true middle school program were key factors in determining if the building should be remodeled or replaced. The fiscally conservative community had already defeated a bond issue to remodel due to public opinion that the old building already had enough space.

Strategic Resources West (SRW) recommended that a conditions assessment be completed to address the current needs of the seventh and eighth grade middle school configuration, as well as the chronic maintenance requirements of a  90+ year-old building. The recommendation also included a more comprehensive examination, which also considered the lack of space at the elementary level.

This analysis by Strategic Resources West revealed that moving the sixth graders up to the middle school in a new facility would resolve overcrowding issues at the elementary level through a “one school, rather than many” approach that clearly appealed to voters.

As part of the process, SRW facilitated a committee of well-respected, high profile community leaders to help educate and influence the public regarding the needs, options and consequences of not building a new middle school. The bond issue was fully supported by the committee, which led to a change in public opinion and a successful bond election. It was the first successful bond election passed by the community in many years.

Strategic Resources West facilitated the compelling process that was necessary to secure the success of one of the most important bond issues the community had seen in decades. The leadership, direction and comprehensive approach provided by SRW was the difference in assisting the school district with its needs.

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2 Responses to “Determining The Real Issue”

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